APPENDIX The Principles of Newspeak George Orwell

https://archive.org/stream/
OrwellGeorge1984Bilingue/
Orwell%20George%20-%201984%20
-%20Bilingue_djvu.txt


1984 es una película de 1956 de ficción distópica británica, dirigida por Michael Anderson y basada en la novela homónima del escritor George Orwell. Es la primera adaptación fílmica de dicha novela. Donald Pleasence también apareció en la versión para televisión filmada en 1954.

APPENDIX

The Principles of Newspeak

Newspeak was the official language of Oceania and had been devised to meet the ideological needs of
Ingsoc, or English Socialism. In the year 1984 there was not as yet anyone who used Newspeak as his
sole means of communication, either in speech or writing. The leading articles in ‘The Times’ were
written in it, but this was a TOUR DE FORCE which could only be carried out by a specialist. It was
expected that Newspeak would have finally superseded Oldspeak (or Standard English, as we should
call it) by about the year 2050. Meanwhile it gained ground steadily, all Party members tending to use
Newspeak words and grammatical constructions more and more in their everyday speech. The version
in use in 1984, and embodied in the Ninth and Tenth Editions of the Newspeak Dictionary, was a
provisional one, and contained many superfluous words and archaic formations which were due to be
suppressed later. It is with the final, perfected version, as embodied in the Eleventh Edition of the
Dictionary, that we are concerned here.

The purpose of Newspeak was not only to provide a medium of expression for the world-view and
mental habits proper to the devotees of Ingsoc, but to make all other modes of thought impossible. It
was intended that when Newspeak had been adopted once and for all and Oldspeak forgotten, a
heretical thought — that is, a thought diverging from the principles of Ingsoc — should be literally
unthinkable, at least so far as thought is dependent on words. Its vocabulary was so constructed as to
give exact and often very subtle expression to every meaning that a Party member could properly wish
to express, while excluding all other meanings and also the possibility of arriving at them by indirect
methods. This was done partly by the invention of new words, but chiefly by eliminating undesirable
words and by stripping such words as remained of unorthodox meanings, and so far as possible of all
secondary meanings whatever. To give a single example. The word FREE still existed in Newspeak,
but it could only be used in such statements as ‘This dog is free from lice’ or ‘This field is free from
weeds’. It could not be used in its old sense of ‘politically free’ or ‘intellectually free’ since political
and intellectual freedom no longer existed even as concepts, and were therefore of necessity nameless.
Quite apart from the suppression of definitely heretical words, reduction of vocabulary was regarded as
an end in itself, and no word that could be dispensed with was allowed to survive. Newspeak was
designed not to extend but to DIMINISH the range of thought, and this purpose was indirectly assisted
by cutting the choice of words down to a minimum.

Newspeak was founded on the English language as we now know it, though many Newspeak
sentences, even when not containing newly-created words, would be barely intelligible to an English-
speaker of our own day. Newspeak words were divided into three distinct classes, known as the A
vocabulary, the B vocabulary (also called compound words), and the C vocabulary. It will be simpler
to discuss each class separately, but the grammatical peculiarities of the language can be dealt with in
the section devoted to the A vocabulary, since the same rules held good for all three categories.

THE A VOCABULARY. The A vocabulary consisted of the words needed for the business of
everyday life — for such things as eating, drinking, working, putting on one’s clothes, going up and
down stairs, riding in vehicles, gardening, cooking, and the like. It was composed almost entirely of
words that we already possess words like HIT, RUN, DOG, TREE, SUGAR, HOUSE, FIELD — but in

George Orwell

19 8 4

338

comparison with the present-day English vocabulary their number was extremely small, while their
meanings were far more rigidly defined. All ambiguities and shades of meaning had been purged out of
them. So far as it could be achieved, a Newspeak word of this class was simply a staccato sound
expressing ONE clearly understood concept. It would have been quite impossible to use the A
vocabulary for literary purposes or for political or philosophical discussion. It was intended only to
express simple, purposive thoughts, usually involving concrete objects or physical actions.

The grammar of Newspeak had two outstanding peculiarities. The first of these was an almost
complete interchangeability between different parts of speech. Any word in the language (in principle
this applied even to very abstract words such as IF or WHEN) could be used either as verb, noun,
adjective, or adverb. Between the verb and the noun form, when they were of the same root, there was
never any variation, this rule of itself involving the destruction of many archaic forms. The word
THOUGHT, for example, did not exist in Newspeak. Its place was taken by THINK, which did duty
for both noun and verb. No etymological principle was followed here: in some cases it was the original
noun that was chosen for retention, in other cases the verb. Even where a noun and verb of kindred
meaning were not etymologically connected, one or other of them was frequently suppressed. There
was, for example, no such word as CUT, its meaning being sufficiently covered by the noun-verb
KNIFE. Adjectives were formed by adding the suffix — FUL to the noun- verb, and adverbs by adding
— WISE. Thus for example, SPEEDFUL meant ‘rapid’ and SPEEDWISE meant ‘quickly’ . Certain of
our present-day adjectives, such as GOOD, STRONG, BIG, BLACK, SOFT, were retained, but their
total number was very small. There was little need for them, since almost any adjectival meaning could
be arrived at by adding — FUL to a noun-verb. None of the now-existing adverbs was retained, except
for a very few already ending in — WISE: the — WISE termination was invariable. The word WELL,
for example, was replaced by GOODWISE.

In addition, any word — this again applied in principle to every word in the language — could be
negatived by adding the affix UN-, or could be strengthened by the affix PLUS-, or, for still greater
emphasis, DOUBLEPLUS-. Thus, for example, UNCOLD meant ‘warm’, while PLUSCOLD and
DOUBLEPLUSCOLD meant, respectively, ‘very cold’ and ‘superlatively cold’. It was also possible,
as in present-day English, to modify the meaning of almost any word by prepositional affixes such as
ANTE-, POST-, UP-, DOWN-, etc. By such methods it was found possible to bring about an enormous
diminution of vocabulary. Given, for instance, the word GOOD, there was no need for such a word as
BAD, since the required meaning was equally well — indeed, better — expressed by UNGOOD. All that
was necessary, in any case where two words formed a natural pair of opposites, was to decide which of
them to suppress. DARK, for example, could be replaced by UNLIGHT, or LIGHT by UNDARK,
according to preference.

The second distinguishing mark of Newspeak grammar was its regularity. Subject to a few exceptions
which are mentioned below all inflexions followed the same rules. Thus, in all verbs the preterite and
the past participle were the same and ended in — ED. The preterite of STEAL was STEALED, the
preterite of THINK was THINKED, and so on throughout the language, all such forms as SWAM,
GAVE, BROUGHT, SPOKE, TAKEN, etc., being abolished. All plurals were made by adding — S or
— ES as the case might be. The plurals OF MAN, OX, LIFE, were MANS, OXES, LIFES. Comparison
of adjectives was invariably made by adding — ER, — EST (GOOD, GOODER, GOODEST), irregular
forms and the MORE, MOST formation being suppressed.

The only classes of words that were still allowed to inflect irregularly were the pronouns, the relatives,

George Orwell

19 8 4

339

the demonstrative adjectives, and the auxiliary verbs. All of these followed their ancient usage, except
that WHOM had been scrapped as unnecessary, and the SHALL, SHOULD tenses had been dropped,
all their uses being covered by WILL and WOULD. There were also certain irregularities in word-
formation arising out of the need for rapid and easy speech. A word which was difficult to utter, or was
liable to be incorrectly heard, was held to be ipso facto a bad word; occasionally therefore, for the sake
of euphony, extra letters were inserted into a word or an archaic formation was retained. But this need
made itself felt chiefly in connexion with the B vocabulary. WHY so great an importance was attached
to ease of pronunciation will be made clear later in this essay.

THE B VOCABULARY. The B vocabulary consisted of words which had been deliberately
constructed for political purposes: words, that is to say, which not only had in every case a political
implication, but were intended to impose a desirable mental attitude upon the person using them.
Without a full understanding of the principles of Ingsoc it was difficult to use these words correctly. In
some cases they could be translated into Oldspeak, or even into words taken from the A vocabulary,
but this usually demanded a long paraphrase and always involved the loss of certain overtones. The B
words were a sort of verbal shorthand, often packing whole ranges of ideas into a few syllables, and at
the same time more accurate and forcible than ordinary language.

The B words were in all cases compound words. [Compound words such as SPEAKWRTTE, were of
course to be found in the A vocabulary, but these were merely convenient abbreviations and had no
special ideological colour.] They consisted of two or more words, or portions of words, welded
together in an easily pronounceable form. The resulting amalgam was always a noun-verb, and
inflected according to the ordinary rules. To take a single example: the word GOODTHINK, meaning,
very roughly, ‘orthodoxy’, or, if one chose to regard it as a verb, ‘to think in an orthodox manner’. This
inflected as follows: noun-verb, GOODTHINK; past tense and past participle, GOODTHINKED;
present participle, GOOD-THINKING; adjective, GOODTHINKFUL; adverb, GOODTHINKWISE;
verbal noun, GOODTHINKER.

The B words were not constructed on any etymological plan. The words of which they were made up
could be any parts of speech, and could be placed in any order and mutilated in any way which made
them easy to pronounce while indicating their derivation. In the word CRIMETHINK (thoughtcrime),
for instance, the THINK came second, whereas in THINKPOL (Thought Police) it came first, and in
the latter word POLICE had lost its second syllable. Because of the great difficulty in securing
euphony, irregular formations were commoner in the B vocabulary than in the A vocabulary. For
example, the adjective forms of MINITRUE, MINIPAX, and MINILUV were, respectively,
MINITRUTHFUL, MINIPEACEFUL, and MINILOVELY, simply because — TRUEFUL, -PAXFUL,
and — LOVEFUL were slightly awkward to pronounce. In principle, however, all B words could
inflect, and all inflected in exactly the same way.

Some of the B words had highly subtilized meanings, barely intelligible to anyone who had not
mastered the language as a whole. Consider, for example, such a typical sentence from a ‘Times’
leading article as OLDTHINKERS UNBELLYFEEL INGSOC. The shortest rendering that one could
make of this in Oldspeak would be: ‘Those whose ideas were formed before the Revolution cannot
have a full emotional understanding of the principles of English Socialism.’ But this is not an adequate
translation. To begin with, in order to grasp the full meaning of the Newspeak sentence quoted above,
one would have to have a clear idea of what is meant by INGSOC. And in addition, only a person
thoroughly grounded in Ingsoc could appreciate the full force of the word BELLYFEEL, which

George Orwell

19 8 4

340

implied a blind, enthusiastic acceptance difficult to imagine today; or of the word OLDTHINK, which
was inextricably mixed up with the idea of wickedness and decadence. But the special function of
certain Newspeak words, of which OLDTHINK was one, was not so much to express meanings as to
destroy them. These words, necessarily few in number, had had their meanings extended until they
contained within themselves whole batteries of words which, as they were sufficiently covered by a
single comprehensive term, could now be scrapped and forgotten. The greatest difficulty facing the
compilers of the Newspeak Dictionary was not to invent new words, but, having invented them, to
make sure what they meant: to make sure, that is to say, what ranges of words they cancelled by their
existence.

As we have already seen in the case of the word FREE, words which had once borne a heretical
meaning were sometimes retained for the sake of convenience, but only with the undesirable meanings
purged out of them. Countless other words such as HONOUR, JUSTICE, MORALITY,
INTERNATIONALISM, DEMOCRACY, SCIENCE, and RELIGION had simply ceased to exist. A
few blanket words covered them, and, in covering them, abolished them. All words grouping
themselves round the concepts of liberty and equality, for instance, were contained in the single word
CRIMETHINK, while all words grouping themselves round the concepts of objectivity and rationalism
were contained in the single word OLDTHINK. Greater precision would have been dangerous. What
was required in a Party member was an outlook similar to that of the ancient Hebrew who knew,
without knowing much else, that all nations other than his own worshipped ‘false gods’. He did not
need to know that these gods were called Baal, Osiris, Moloch, Ashtaroth, and the like: probably the
less he knew about them the better for his orthodoxy. He knew Jehovah and the commandments of
Jehovah: he knew, therefore, that all gods with other names or other attributes were false gods. In
somewhat the same way, the party member knew what constituted right conduct, and in exceedingly
vague, generalized terms he knew what kinds of departure from it were possible. His sexual life, for
example, was entirely regulated by the two Newspeak words SEXCRIME (sexual immorality) and
GOODSEX (chastity). SEXCRIME covered all sexual misdeeds whatever. It covered fornication,
adultery, homosexuality, and other perversions, and, in addition, normal intercourse practised for its
own sake. There was no need to enumerate them separately, since they were all equally culpable, and,
in principle, all punishable by death. In the C vocabulary, which consisted of scientific and technical
words, it might be necessary to give specialized names to certain sexual aberrations, but the ordinary
citizen had no need of them. He knew what was meant by GOODSEX — that is to say, normal
intercourse between man and wife, for the sole purpose of begetting children, and without physical
pleasure on the part of the woman: all else was SEXCRIME. In Newspeak it was seldom possible to
follow a heretical thought further than the perception that it WAS heretical: beyond that point the
necessary words were nonexistent.

No word in the B vocabulary was ideologically neutral. A great many were euphemisms. Such words,
for instance, as JOYCAMP (forced-labour camp) or MINIPAX (Ministry of Peace, i.e. Ministry of
War) meant almost the exact opposite of what they appeared to mean. Some words, on the other hand,
displayed a frank and contemptuous understanding of the real nature of Oceanic society. An example
was PROLEFEED, meaning the rubbishy entertainment and spurious news which the Party handed out
to the masses. Other words, again, were ambivalent, having the connotation ‘good’ when applied to the
Party and ‘bad’ when applied to its enemies. But in addition there were great numbers of words which
at first sight appeared to be mere abbreviations and which derived their ideological colour not from
their meaning, but from their structure.

So far as it could be contrived, everything that had or might have political significance of any kind was
fitted into the B vocabulary. The name of every organization, or body of people, or doctrine, or

George Orwell

19 8 4

341

country, or institution, or public building, was invariably cut down into the familiar shape; that is, a
single easily pronounced word with the smallest number of syllables that would preserve the original
derivation. In the Ministry of Truth, for example, the Records Department, in which Winston Smith
worked, was called RECDEP, the Fiction Department was called FICDEP, the Teleprogrammes
Department was called TELEDEP, and so on. This was not done solely with the object of saving time.
Even in the early decades of the twentieth century, telescoped words and phrases had been one of the
characteristic features of political language; and it had been noticed that the tendency to use
abbreviations of this kind was most marked in totalitarian countries and totalitarian organizations.
Examples were such words as NAZI, GESTAPO, COMINTERN, INPRECORR, AGITPROP. In the
beginning the practice had been adopted as it were instinctively, but in Newspeak it was used with a
conscious purpose. It was perceived that in thus abbreviating a name one narrowed and subtly altered
its meaning, by cutting out most of the associations that would otherwise cling to it. The words
COMMUNIST INTERNATIONAL, for instance, call up a composite picture of universal human
brotherhood, red flags, barricades, Karl Marx, and the Paris Commune. The word COMINTERN, on
the other hand, suggests merely a tightly-knit organization and a well-defined body of doctrine. It
refers to something almost as easily recognized, and as limited in purpose, as a chair or a table.
COMINTERN is a word that can be uttered almost without taking thought, whereas COMMUNIST
INTERNATIONAL is a phrase over which one is obliged to linger at least momentarily. In the same
way, the associations called up by a word like MINITRUE are fewer and more controllable than those
called up by MINISTRY OF TRUTH. This accounted not only for the habit of abbreviating whenever
possible, but also for the almost exaggerated care that was taken to make every word easily
pronounceable.

In Newspeak, euphony outweighed every consideration other than exactitude of meaning. Regularity of
grammar was always sacrificed to it when it seemed necessary. And rightly so, since what was
required, above all for political purposes, was short clipped words of unmistakable meaning which
could be uttered rapidly and which roused the minimum of echoes in the speaker’s mind. The words of
the B vocabulary even gained in force from the fact that nearly all of them were very much alike.
Almost invariably these words— GOODTHINK, MINIPAX, PROLEFEED, SEXCRIME, JOYCAMP,
INGSOC, BELLYFEEL, THINKPOL, and countless others — were words of two or three syllables,
with the stress distributed equally between the first syllable and the last. The use of them encouraged a
gabbling style of speech, at once staccato and monotonous. And this was exactly what was aimed at.
The intention was to make speech, and especially speech on any subject not ideologically neutral, as
nearly as possible independent of consciousness. For the purposes of everyday life it was no doubt
necessary, or sometimes necessary, to reflect before speaking, but a Party member called upon to make
a political or ethical judgement should be able to spray forth the correct opinions as automatically as a
machine gun spraying forth bullets. His training fitted him to do this, the language gave him an almost
foolproof instrument, and the texture of the words, with their harsh sound and a certain wilful ugliness
which was in accord with the spirit of Ingsoc, assisted the process still further.

So did the fact of having very few words to choose from. Relative to our own, the Newspeak
vocabulary was tiny, and new ways of reducing it were constantly being devised. Newspeak, indeed,
differed from most all other languages in that its vocabulary grew smaller instead of larger every year.
Each reduction was a gain, since the smaller the area of choice, the smaller the temptation to take
thought. Ultimately it was hoped to make articulate speech issue from the larynx without involving the
higher brain centres at all. This aim was frankly admitted in the Newspeak word DUCKSPEAK,
meaning ‘to quack like a duck’. Like various other words in the B vocabulary, DUCKSPEAK was
ambivalent in meaning. Provided that the opinions which were quacked out were orthodox ones, it
implied nothing but praise, and when ‘The Times’ referred to one of the orators of the Party as a

George Orwell

19 8 4

342

DOUBLEPLUSGOOD DUCKSPEAKER it was paying a warm and valued compliment.

THE C VOCABULARY. The C vocabulary was supplementary to the others and consisted entirely of
scientific and technical terms. These resembled the scientific terms in use today, and were constructed
from the same roots, but the usual care was taken to define them rigidly and strip them of undesirable
meanings. They followed the same grammatical rules as the words in the other two vocabularies. Very
few of the C words had any currency either in everyday speech or in political speech. Any scientific
worker or technician could find all the words he needed in the list devoted to his own speciality, but he
seldom had more than a smattering of the words occurring in the other lists. Only a very few words
were common to all lists, and there was no vocabulary expressing the function of Science as a habit of
mind, or a method of thought, irrespective of its particular branches. There was, indeed, no word for
‘Science’, any meaning that it could possibly bear being already sufficiently covered by the word
INGSOC.

From the foregoing account it will be seen that in Newspeak the expression of unorthodox opinions,
above a very low level, was well-nigh impossible. It was of course possible to utter heresies of a very
crude kind, a species of blasphemy. It would have been possible, for example, to say BIG BROTHER
IS UNGOOD. But this statement, which to an orthodox ear merely conveyed a self-evident absurdity,
could not have been sustained by reasoned argument, because the necessary words were not available.
Ideas inimical to Ingsoc could only be entertained in a vague wordless form, and could only be named
in very broad terms which lumped together and condemned whole groups of heresies without defining
them in doing so. One could, in fact, only use Newspeak for unorthodox purposes by illegitimately
translating some of the words back into Oldspeak. For example, ALL MANS ARE EQUAL was a
possible Newspeak sentence, but only in the same sense in which ALL MEN ARE REDHAIRED is a
possible Oldspeak sentence. It did not contain a grammatical error, but it expressed a palpable
untruth — i.e. that all men are of equal size, weight, or strength. The concept of political equality no
longer existed, and this secondary meaning had accordingly been purged out of the word EQUAL. In
1984, when Oldspeak was still the normal means of communication, the danger theoretically existed
that in using Newspeak words one might remember their original meanings. In practice it was not
difficult for any person well grounded in DOUBLETHINK to avoid doing this, but within a couple of
generations even the possibility of such a lapse would have vanished. A person growing up with
Newspeak as his sole language would no more know that EQUAL had once had the secondary
meaning of ‘politically equal’, or that FREE had once meant ‘intellectually free’, than for instance, a
person who had never heard of chess would be aware of the secondary meanings attaching to QUEEN
and ROOK. There would be many crimes and errors which it would be beyond his power to commit,
simply because they were nameless and therefore unimaginable. And it was to be foreseen that with the
passage of time the distinguishing characteristics of Newspeak would become more and more
pronounced — its words growing fewer and fewer, their meanings more and more rigid, and the chance
of putting them to improper uses always diminishing.

When Oldspeak had been once and for all superseded, the last link with the past would have been
severed. History had already been rewritten, but fragments of the literature of the past survived here
and there, imperfectly censored, and so long as one retained one’s knowledge of Oldspeak it was
possible to read them. In the future such fragments, even if they chanced to survive, would be
unintelligible and untranslatable. It was impossible to translate any passage of Oldspeak into Newspeak
unless it either referred to some technical process or some very simple everyday action, or was already
orthodox (GOODTHINKFUL would be the Newspeak expression) in tendency. In practice this meant
that no book written before approximately 1960 could be translated as a whole. Pre-revolutionary

George Orwell

19 8 4

343

literature could only be subjected to ideological translation — that is, alteration in sense as well as
language. Take for example the well-known passage from the Declaration of Independence:

WE HOLD THESE TRUTHS TO BE SELF-EVIDENT, THAT ALL MEN ARE CREATED EQUAL,
THAT THEY ARE ENDOWED BY THEIR CREATOR WITH CERTAIN INALIENABLE RIGHTS,
THAT AMONG THESE ARE LIFE, LIBERTY, AND THE PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS. THAT TO
SECURE THESE RIGHTS, GOVERNMENTS ARE INSTITUTED AMONG MEN, DERIVING
THEIR POWERS FROM THE CONSENT OF THE GOVERNED. THAT WHENEVER ANY FORM
OF GOVERNMENT BECOMES DESTRUCTIVE OF THOSE ENDS, IT IS THE RIGHT OF THE
PEOPLE TO ALTER OR ABOLISH IT, AND TO INSTITUTE NEW GOVERNMENT…

It would have been quite impossible to render this into Newspeak while keeping to the sense of the
original. The nearest one could come to doing so would be to swallow the whole passage up in the
single word CRIMETHINK. A full translation could only be an ideological translation, whereby
Jefferson’s words would be changed into a panegyric on absolute government.

A good deal of the literature of the past was, indeed, already being transformed in this way.
Considerations of prestige made it desirable to preserve the memory of certain historical figures, while
at the same time bringing their achievements into line with the philosophy of Ingsoc. Various writers,
such as Shakespeare, Milton, Swift, Byron, Dickens, and some others were therefore in process of
translation: when the task had been completed, their original writings, with all else that survived of the
literature of the past, would be destroyed. These translations were a slow and difficult business, and it
was not expected that they would be finished before the first or second decade of the twenty-first
century. There were also large quantities of merely utilitarian literature — indispensable technical
manuals, and the like — that had to be treated in the same way. It was chiefly in order to allow time for
the preliminary work of translation that the final adoption of Newspeak had been fixed for so late a
date as 2050.

-

-

-

-

-

APÉNDICE

Los principios de Newspeak

Newspeak era el idioma oficial de Oceanía y había sido ideado para satisfacer las necesidades ideológicas de
Ingsoc, o el socialismo inglés. En el año 1984 todavía no había nadie que usara Newspeak como su
único medio de comunicación, ya sea en forma oral o escrita. Los principales artículos de ‘The Times’ estaban
escritos en él, pero se trataba de un TOUR DE FORCE que solo podía ser realizado por un especialista. Se
esperaba que Newspeak finalmente hubiera reemplazado a Oldspeak (o inglés estándar, como deberíamos
llamarlo) alrededor del año 2050. Mientras tanto, ganó terreno de manera constante, todos los miembros del Partido tienden a usar
palabras y construcciones gramaticales de Newspeak cada vez más en su día a día habla. La versión
en uso en 1984, y encarnado en la Novena y Décima Ediciones del Diccionario Newspeak, era
provisional, y contenía muchas palabras superfluas y formaciones arcaicas que debían
suprimirse más tarde. Es con la versión final, perfeccionada, tal como figura en la Undécima Edición del
Diccionario, lo que nos interesa aquí.

El propósito de Newspeak no era solo proporcionar un medio de expresión para la visión del mundo y
los hábitos mentales propios de los devotos de Ingsoc, sino hacer imposible todos los demás modos de pensamiento. Se
pretendía que cuando Newspeak se adoptara de una vez por todas y Oldspeak se olvidara, un
pensamiento herético, es decir, un pensamiento que diverge de los principios de Ingsoc, debería ser literalmente
impensable, al menos en la medida en que el pensamiento depende de las palabras. Su vocabulario se construyó de manera que
diera una expresión exacta ya menudo muy sutil a cada significado que un miembro del Partido pudiera desear
expresar adecuadamente , al tiempo que excluye todos los demás significados y también la posibilidad de llegar a ellos por medio indirecto.
métodos. Esto se hizo en parte mediante la invención de nuevas palabras, pero principalmente mediante la eliminación de
palabras indeseables y quitando las palabras que quedaron de significados no ortodoxos, y en la medida de lo posible de todos
los significados secundarios. Para dar un solo ejemplo. La palabra LIBRE aún existía en Newspeak,
pero solo podía usarse en declaraciones como ‘Este perro está libre de piojos’ o ‘Este campo está libre de
malezas’. No podía usarse en su antiguo sentido de ‘políticamente libre’ o ‘intelectualmente libre’ ya que
la libertad política e intelectual ya no existía ni siquiera como conceptos, y por lo tanto eran necesariamente sin nombre.
Aparte de la supresión de palabras definitivamente heréticas, la reducción del vocabulario se consideró como
un fin en sí mismo, y ninguna palabra de la que se pudiera prescindir se le permitió sobrevivir. Newspeak fue
diseñado no para extender sino para DISMINUIR el rango de pensamiento, y este propósito fue indirectamente asistido
al reducir la elección de palabras al mínimo.

Newspeak se fundó en el idioma inglés tal como lo conocemos ahora, aunque muchas
oraciones de Newspeak , incluso cuando no contienen palabras recién creadas, serían apenas inteligibles para un
angloparlante de nuestros días. Las palabras de noticias se dividieron en tres clases distintas, conocidas como
vocabulario A , vocabulario B (también llamadas palabras compuestas) y vocabulario C. Será más sencillo
discutir cada clase por separado, pero las peculiaridades gramaticales del lenguaje pueden tratarse en
la sección dedicada al vocabulario A, ya que las mismas reglas se aplicaron a las tres categorías.

EL UN VOCABULARIO. El vocabulario A consistía en las palabras necesarias para el negocio de
la vida cotidiana: para comer, beber, trabajar, ponerse la ropa, subir y
bajar escaleras, andar en vehículos, jardinería, cocinar y cosas similares. Estaba compuesto casi por completo de
palabras que ya poseemos palabras como HIT, RUN, DOG, TREE, SUGAR, HOUSE, FIELD, pero en

George Orwell

19 8 4

338

En comparación con el vocabulario inglés actual, su número era extremadamente pequeño, mientras que sus
significados estaban mucho más rígidamente definidos. Todas las ambigüedades y matices de significado habían sido eliminados de
ellos. Hasta donde se pudo lograr, una palabra de Newspeak de esta clase era simplemente un sonido staccato que
expresa UN concepto claramente entendido. Hubiera sido bastante imposible utilizar el
vocabulario A para fines literarios o para debates políticos o filosóficos. Fue diseñado solo para
expresar pensamientos simples y deliberados, que generalmente involucran objetos concretos o acciones físicas.

La gramática de Newspeak tenía dos peculiaridades sobresalientes. El primero de ellos fue una
intercambiabilidad casi completa entre diferentes partes del discurso. Cualquier palabra en el lenguaje (en principio
esto se aplica incluso a palabras muy abstractas como IF o WHEN) podría usarse como verbo, sustantivo,
adjetivo o adverbio. Entre el verbo y la forma del sustantivo, cuando eran de la misma raíz,
nunca hubo variación, esta regla en sí misma implicaba la destrucción de muchas formas arcaicas. La palabra
PENSAMIENTO, por ejemplo, no existía en Newspeak. Su lugar fue ocupado por THINK, que cumplía
con el deber tanto del sustantivo como del verbo. Aquí no se siguió ningún principio etimológico: en algunos casos fue el original
sustantivo que fue elegido para retención, en otros casos el verbo. Incluso cuando un sustantivo y un verbo de
significado afín no estaban relacionados etimológicamente, uno u otro de ellos era frecuentemente suprimido. No
había, por ejemplo, una palabra tal como CORTE, su significado estaba suficientemente cubierto por el sustantivo-verbo
CUCHILLO. Los adjetivos se formaron agregando el sufijo – FUL al sustantivo y los adverbios agregando
- WISE. Así, por ejemplo, SPEEDFUL significa “rápido” y SPEEDWISE significa “rápidamente”. Algunos de
nuestros adjetivos actuales, como BUENO, FUERTE, GRANDE, NEGRO, SUAVE, se conservaron, pero su
número total fue muy pequeño. Había poca necesidad de ellos, ya que casi cualquier significado adjetivo podría
llegar a mediante la adición de – FUL a un verbo sustantivo. Ninguno de los adverbios ahora existentes se retuvo, excepto
unos pocos que ya terminaban en – SABIO: la terminación – SABIO era invariable. La palabra BIEN,
por ejemplo, fue reemplazada por BUENO.

Además, cualquier palabra, esto nuevamente aplicado en principio a cada palabra en el idioma, podría ser
negativa al agregar el afijo UN-, o podría ser fortalecido por el afijo PLUS- o, para mayor
énfasis, DOUBLEPLUS-. Así, por ejemplo, UNCOLD significaba “cálido”, mientras que PLUSCOLD y
DOUBLEPLUSCOLD significaban, respectivamente, “muy frío” y “superlativamente frío”. También era posible,
como en el inglés actual, modificar el significado de casi cualquier palabra mediante afijos preposicionales como
ANTE-, POST-, UP-, DOWN-, etc. Por tales métodos se encontró posible lograr un enorme
disminución de vocabulario. Dada, por ejemplo, la palabra BUENA, no había necesidad de una palabra como
MALO, ya que el significado requerido era igualmente bueno, de hecho, mejor, expresado por UNGOOD. Todo lo que
era necesario, en cualquier caso donde dos palabras formaban un par natural de opuestos, era decidir cuál de
ellos suprimir. DARK, por ejemplo, podría reemplazarse por UNLIGHT o LIGHT por UNDARK,
según su preferencia.

La segunda marca distintiva de la gramática de Newspeak fue su regularidad. Sujeto a algunas excepciones
que se mencionan a continuación, todas las inflexiones siguieron las mismas reglas. Por lo tanto, en todos los verbos, el participio pretérito y
el pasado eran iguales y terminaban en – ED. El pretérito de STEAL fue ROBADO, el
pretérito de THINK fue PENSADO, y así sucesivamente en todo el lenguaje, todas las formas tales como SWAM, GAVE, BROUGHT, SPOKE, TAKEN
, etc., fueron abolidas. Todos los plurales se hicieron agregando – S o
- ES según sea el caso. Los plurales de MAN, OX, LIFE, fueron MANS, OXES, LIFES. La comparación
de adjetivos se hizo invariablemente agregando – ER, – EST (BUENO, MÁS BUENO, MÁS BUENO),
formas irregulares y la formación MÁS, MÁS se suprimió.

Las únicas clases de palabras que todavía se podían infligir irregularmente eran los pronombres, los parientes,

George Orwell

19 8 4

339

los adjetivos demostrativos y los verbos auxiliares. Todos estos siguieron su antiguo uso, excepto
que QUIEN había sido desechado como innecesario, y los TIEMPOS DEBERÍAN DEJARSE, y
todos sus usos estaban cubiertos por WILL y WOULD. También hubo ciertas irregularidades en la
formación de palabras que surgieron de la necesidad de un habla rápida y fácil. Una palabra que era difícil de pronunciar, o
que podía ser escuchada incorrectamente, se consideraba ipso facto como una mala palabra; de vez en cuando, por el bien
de la eufonía, se insertaron letras adicionales en una palabra o se retuvo una formación arcaica. Pero esta necesidad se
hizo sentir principalmente en relación con el vocabulario B. POR QUÉ se le dio tanta importancia
para facilitar la pronunciación se aclarará más adelante en este ensayo.

EL B VOCABULARIO. El vocabulario B consistía en palabras que habían sido
construidas deliberadamente para fines políticos: palabras, es decir, que no solo tenían en todos los casos una
implicación política , sino que tenían la intención de imponer una actitud mental deseable sobre la persona que las usaba.
Sin una comprensión completa de los principios de Ingsoc, era difícil usar estas palabras correctamente. En
algunos casos, podrían traducirse a Oldspeak, o incluso a palabras tomadas del vocabulario A,
pero esto generalmente exigía una paráfrasis larga y siempre implicaba la pérdida de ciertos armónicos. Las
palabras B eran una especie de taquigrafía verbal, a menudo agrupando una gama completa de ideas en unas pocas sílabas, y en
Al mismo tiempo más preciso y fuerte que el lenguaje ordinario.

Las palabras B fueron en todos los casos palabras compuestas. [Las palabras compuestas como SPEAKWRTTE, por
supuesto, se encontraban en el vocabulario A, pero estas eran simplemente abreviaturas convenientes y no tenían
un color ideológico especial.] Consistían en dos o más palabras, o porciones de palabras, soldadas
juntas de manera fácil forma pronunciable La amalgama resultante siempre fue un verbo sustantivo, y se
flexionó de acuerdo con las reglas ordinarias. Para tomar un solo ejemplo: la palabra GOODTHINK, que significa,
más o menos, ‘ortodoxia’, o, si se elige considerarlo como un verbo, ‘pensar de manera ortodoxa’. Esto se
flexionó de la siguiente manera: sustantivo-verbo, GOODTHINK; tiempo pasado y participio pasado, BIEN PENSADO;
participio presente, BUEN PENSAMIENTO; adjetivo, BUEN PENSAMIENTO; adverbio, GOODTHINKWISE;
sustantivo verbal, GOODTHINKER.

Las palabras B no fueron construidas en ningún plan etimológico. Las palabras de las que estaban formadas
podían ser cualquier parte del discurso, y podían colocarse en cualquier orden y mutilarse de cualquier manera que los hiciera
fáciles de pronunciar e indicara su derivación. En la palabra CRIMETHINK (crimen de pensamiento),
por ejemplo, el THINK quedó en segundo lugar, mientras que en THINKPOL (Thought Police) llegó primero, y en
la última palabra POLICE había perdido su segunda sílaba. Debido a la gran dificultad para asegurar la
eufonía, las formaciones irregulares eran más comunes en el vocabulario B que en el vocabulario A. Por
ejemplo, las formas adjetivas de MINITRUE, MINIPAX y MINILUV fueron, respectivamente,
MINITRUTHFUL, MINIPEACEFUL y MINILOVELY, simplemente porque – TRUEFUL, -PAXFUL,
y – LOVEFUL fueron un poco incómodos de pronunciar. En principio, sin embargo, todas las palabras B podrían
flexionarse, y todas se flexionan exactamente de la misma manera.

Algunas de las palabras B tenían significados muy subtilizados, apenas inteligibles para cualquiera que no hubiera
dominado el idioma en su conjunto. Considere, por ejemplo, una oración tan típica de un
artículo principal del ‘Times’ como OLDTHINKERS UNBELLYFEEL INGSOC. La interpretación más breve que se podría
hacer de esto en Oldspeak sería: “Aquellos cuyas ideas se formaron antes de la Revolución no pueden
tener una comprensión emocional completa de los principios del socialismo inglés”. Pero esta no es una
traducción adecuada . Para empezar, para comprender el significado completo de la oración Newspeak citada anteriormente,
uno tendría que tener una idea clara de lo que significa INGSOC. Y además, solo una persona
completamente arraigado en Ingsoc podía apreciar la fuerza total de la palabra BELLYFEEL, que

George Orwell

19 8 4

340

implicaba una aceptación ciega y entusiasta difícil de imaginar hoy; o de la palabra OLDTHINK, que
estaba inextricablemente mezclada con la idea de maldad y decadencia. Pero la función especial de
ciertas palabras de Newspeak, de las cuales OLDTHINK era una, no era tanto expresar significados como
destruirlos. Estas palabras, necesariamente pocas en número, habían extendido sus significados hasta que
contenían dentro de sí baterías enteras de palabras que, como estaban suficientemente cubiertas por un
solo término integral, ahora podían ser desechadas y olvidadas. La mayor dificultad que enfrentaron los
compiladores del Newspeak Dictionary no fue inventar nuevas palabras, sino, habiéndolas inventado,
asegúrese de lo que significaban: para asegurarse, es decir, qué rangos de palabras cancelaron por su
existencia.

Como ya hemos visto en el caso de la palabra LIBRE, las palabras que alguna vez tuvieron un
significado herético a veces se conservan por conveniencia, pero solo con los significados indeseables que se han
eliminado. Innumerables otras palabras como HONOR, JUSTICIA, MORALIDAD,
INTERNACIONALISMO, DEMOCRACIA, CIENCIA y RELIGIÓN simplemente habían dejado de existir. Unas
pocas palabras generales los cubrieron y, al cubrirlos, los abolieron. Todas las palabras que se agrupan
en torno a los conceptos de libertad e igualdad, por ejemplo, estaban contenidas en la sola palabra
CRIMETHINK, mientras que todas las palabras que se agrupaban en torno a los conceptos de objetividad y racionalismo
estaban contenidas en la sola palabra OLDTHINK. Una mayor precisión habría sido peligrosa. Qué
Se requería que un miembro del Partido tuviera una perspectiva similar a la del antiguo hebreo que sabía,
sin saber mucho más, que todas las naciones que no fueran sus propios adoraban a los “dioses falsos”. No
necesitaba saber que estos dioses se llamaban Baal, Osiris, Moloch, Ashtaroth y similares: probablemente cuanto
menos supiera sobre ellos, mejor para su ortodoxia. Conocía a Jehová y los mandamientos de
Jehová: sabía, por lo tanto, que todos los dioses con otros nombres u otros atributos eran dioses falsos. De
la misma manera, el miembro del partido sabía lo que constituía una conducta correcta, y en
términos extremadamente vagos y generalizados sabía qué tipos de desviación de la misma eran posibles. Su vida sexual, por
ejemplo, estaba completamente regulado por las dos palabras de Newspeak SEXCRIME (inmoralidad sexual) y
GOODSEX (castidad). SEXCRIME cubrió todas las fechorías sexuales. Cubría la fornicación, el
adulterio, la homosexualidad y otras perversiones y, además, las relaciones sexuales normales practicadas por sí
mismas. No había necesidad de enumerarlos por separado, ya que todos eran igualmente culpables y,
en principio, todos castigables con la muerte. En el vocabulario C, que consistía en
palabras científicas y técnicas , podría ser necesario dar nombres especializados a ciertas aberraciones sexuales, pero el
ciudadano común no las necesitaba. Sabía lo que significaba GOODSEX, es decir, normal.
relaciones sexuales entre el hombre y la esposa, con el único propósito de engendrar hijos, y sin
placer físico por parte de la mujer: todo lo demás era SEXCRIME. En Newspeak rara vez era posible
seguir un pensamiento herético más allá de la percepción de que FUE herético: más allá de ese punto, las
palabras necesarias eran inexistentes.

Ninguna palabra en el vocabulario B era ideológicamente neutral. Muchos eran eufemismos. Tales palabras,
por ejemplo, como JOYCAMP (campo de trabajos forzados) o MINIPAX (Ministerio de Paz, es decir, Ministerio de
Guerra) significaban casi exactamente lo contrario de lo que parecían significar. Algunas palabras, por otro lado,
muestran una comprensión franca y despectiva de la naturaleza real de la sociedad oceánica. Un ejemplo
fue PROLEFEED, que significa el entretenimiento basura y las noticias espurias que el Partido entregó
a las masas. Otras palabras, nuevamente, eran ambivalentes, con la connotación de “bueno” cuando se aplicaba al
Partido y “malo” cuando se aplicaba a sus enemigos. Pero además había un gran número de palabras que
a primera vista parecían ser simples abreviaturas y que derivaban su color ideológico no de
su significado, sino de su estructura.

En la medida en que se pudo idear, todo lo que tenía o podría tener un significado político de cualquier tipo se
ajustó al vocabulario B. El nombre de cada organización, o cuerpo de personas, o doctrina, o

George Orwell

19 8 4

341

país, institución o edificio público, invariablemente se redujo a la forma familiar; es decir, una
sola palabra fácil de pronunciar con el menor número de sílabas que preservarían la
derivación original . En el Ministerio de la Verdad, por ejemplo, el Departamento de Registros, en el que
trabajaba Winston Smith , se llamaba RECDEP, el Departamento de Ficción se llamaba FICDEP, el
Departamento de Teleprogramas se llamaba TELEDEP, etc. Esto no se hizo únicamente con el objeto de ahorrar tiempo.
Incluso en las primeras décadas del siglo XX, las palabras y frases telescópicas habían sido uno de los
rasgos característicos del lenguaje político; y se había notado que la tendencia a usar
Las abreviaturas de este tipo fueron más marcadas en los países totalitarios y en las organizaciones totalitarias.
Ejemplos fueron palabras como NAZI, GESTAPO, COMINTERN, INPRECORR, AGITPROP. Al
principio, la práctica se había adoptado instintivamente, pero en Newspeak se usó con un
propósito consciente. Se percibió que al abreviar así un nombre, uno reducía y alteraba sutilmente
su significado, eliminando la mayoría de las asociaciones que de otro modo se aferrarían a él. Las palabras
INTERNACIONAL COMUNISTA, por ejemplo, llaman una imagen compuesta de la
hermandad humana universal , banderas rojas, barricadas, Karl Marx y la Comuna de París. La palabra COMINTERN, en
Por otro lado, sugiere simplemente una organización muy unida y un cuerpo de doctrina bien definido. Se
refiere a algo casi tan fácil de reconocer y tan limitado en su propósito, como una silla o una mesa.
COMINTERN es una palabra que se puede pronunciar casi sin pensar, mientras que COMMUNIST
INTERNATIONAL es una frase sobre la cual uno está obligado a quedarse al menos momentáneamente. Del mismo
modo, las asociaciones llamadas por una palabra como MINITRUE son menos y más controlables que las
llamadas por MINISTERIO DE VERDAD. Esto explicaba no solo el hábito de abreviar siempre que era
posible, sino también el cuidado casi exagerado que se tomó para hacer que cada palabra sea fácilmente
pronunciable.

En Newspeak, la eufonía superaba todas las consideraciones que no fueran la exactitud del significado. La regularidad de la
gramática siempre se sacrificaba cuando parecía necesario. Y con razón, dado que lo que se
requería, sobre todo para fines políticos, eran palabras cortas y recortadas de significado inconfundible que se
pudieran pronunciar rápidamente y que despertaran el mínimo de ecos en la mente del hablante. Las palabras del
vocabulario B incluso cobraron fuerza por el hecho de que casi todas eran muy parecidas.
Casi invariablemente, estas palabras: GOODTHINK, MINIPAX, PROLEFEED, SEXCRIME, JOYCAMP,
INGSOC, BELLYFEEL, THINKPOL e innumerables, fueron palabras de dos o tres sílabas
con la tensión distribuida equitativamente entre la primera sílaba y la última. El uso de ellos fomentó un
estilo de habla parloteante, a la vez staccato y monótono. Y esto era exactamente a lo que apuntaba.
La intención era hacer un discurso, y especialmente un discurso sobre cualquier tema no ideológicamente neutral, lo más
cerca posible de la conciencia. Para los propósitos de la vida cotidiana, sin duda era
necesario, o a veces necesario, reflexionar antes de hablar, pero un miembro del Partido llamado a emitir
un juicio político o ético debería ser capaz de emitir las opiniones correctas tan automáticamente como una
ametralladora. adelante balas. Su entrenamiento lo capacitó para hacer esto, el lenguaje le dio un
El instrumento infalible, y la textura de las palabras, con su sonido áspero y una cierta fealdad deliberada
que estaba de acuerdo con el espíritu de Ingsoc, ayudó al proceso aún más.

También lo hizo el hecho de tener muy pocas palabras para elegir. En relación con el nuestro, el
vocabulario de Newspeak era pequeño, y constantemente se idearon nuevas formas de reducirlo. Newspeak, de hecho, se
diferenciaba de la mayoría de los otros idiomas en que su vocabulario se hacía cada vez más pequeño en lugar de hacerlo cada año.
Cada reducción fue una ganancia, ya que cuanto menor es el área de elección, menor es la tentación de
pensar. En última instancia, se esperaba hacer un problema articular del habla desde la laringe sin involucrar a los
centros cerebrales superiores. Este objetivo fue francamente admitido en la palabra Newspeak DUCKSPEAK, que
significa ” graznar como un pato”. Al igual que varias otras palabras en el vocabulario B, DUCKSPEAK fue
ambivalente en significado. Siempre que las opiniones que fueron criticadas fueran ortodoxas, no
implicaban nada más que elogios, y cuando ‘The Times’ se refirió a uno de los oradores del Partido como un

George Orwell

19 8 4

342

DUBLEPLUSGOOD DUCKSPEAKER estaba haciendo un cálido y valioso cumplido.

EL C VOCABULARIO. El vocabulario C era complementario a los demás y consistía enteramente en
términos científicos y técnicos. Estos se parecían a los términos científicos en uso hoy en día, y se construyeron a
partir de las mismas raíces, pero se tuvo el cuidado habitual de definirlos rígidamente y despojarlos de
significados indeseables . Siguieron las mismas reglas gramaticales que las palabras en los otros dos vocabularios. Muy
pocas de las palabras C tenían alguna vigencia, ya sea en el discurso cotidiano o en el discurso político. Cualquier
trabajador científico o técnico podría encontrar todas las palabras que necesitaba en la lista dedicada a su propia especialidad, pero
rara vez tenía más que un puñado de palabras en las otras listas. Solo unas pocas palabras
eran comunes a todas las listas, y no había vocabulario que expresara la función de la Ciencia como un hábito
mental o un método de pensamiento, independientemente de sus ramas particulares. De hecho, no había una palabra para
‘Ciencia’, ningún significado que posiblemente podría soportar estar ya suficientemente cubierto por la palabra
INGSOC.

De lo anterior se verá que en Newspeak la expresión de opiniones poco ortodoxas, por
encima de un nivel muy bajo, era casi imposible. Por supuesto, era posible pronunciar herejías de un
tipo muy crudo, una especie de blasfemia. Hubiera sido posible, por ejemplo, decir BIG BROTHER
IS UNGOOD. Pero esta afirmación, que para un oído ortodoxo simplemente transmitía un absurdo evidente,
no podría haber sido sostenida por un argumento razonado, porque las palabras necesarias no estaban disponibles.
Las ideas enemigas de Ingsoc solo podían ser entretenidas en una vaga forma sin palabras, y solo podían ser nombradas
en términos muy amplios que agruparan y condenaran a grupos enteros de herejías sin definir
ellos al hacerlo. De hecho, uno solo podría usar Newspeak para propósitos poco ortodoxos
traduciendo ilegítimamente algunas de las palabras de nuevo a Oldspeak. Por ejemplo, TODOS LOS HOMBRES SON IGUALES fue una
posible oración de Newspeak, pero solo en el mismo sentido en que TODOS LOS HOMBRES SON REDIRIDOS es una
posible oración de Oldspeak. No contenía un error gramatical, pero expresaba una
falsedad palpable , es decir, que todos los hombres son del mismo tamaño, peso o fuerza. El concepto de igualdad política ya
no existía, y este significado secundario se había eliminado de la palabra IGUAL. En
1984, cuando Oldspeak seguía siendo el medio de comunicación normal, el peligro existía teóricamente
que al usar palabras de Newspeak uno podría recordar sus significados originales. En la práctica, no fue
difícil para ninguna persona con buena base en DOUBLETHINK evitar esto, pero en un par de
generaciones, incluso la posibilidad de tal lapso habría desaparecido. Una persona que crece con
Newspeak como su único idioma ya no sabría que EQUAL alguna vez tuvo el
significado secundario de ‘políticamente igual’, o que FREE alguna vez significó ‘intelectualmente libre’, que por ejemplo, una
persona que nunca había oído hablar de el ajedrez estaría al tanto de los significados secundarios que se le atribuyen a QUEEN
y ROOK. Habría muchos crímenes y errores que estaría más allá de su poder cometer,
simplemente porque no tenían nombre y, por lo tanto, eran inimaginables. Y era de prever que con el
paso del tiempo las características distintivas de Newspeak se volverían cada vez más
pronunciadas: sus palabras se volverían cada vez menos, sus significados cada vez más rígidos y la posibilidad
de ponerlos en usos inadecuados siempre disminuye.

Cuando Oldspeak había sido reemplazado de una vez por todas, el último vínculo con el pasado se habría
cortado. La historia ya había sido reescrita, pero fragmentos de la literatura del pasado sobrevivieron aquí
y allá, censurados imperfectamente, y mientras uno conservara el conocimiento de Oldspeak era
posible leerlos. En el futuro, tales fragmentos, incluso si pudieran sobrevivir, serían
ininteligibles e intraducibles. Era imposible traducir cualquier pasaje de Oldspeak a Newspeak a
menos que se refiriera a algún proceso técnico o alguna acción cotidiana muy simple, o ya fuera
ortodoxo (GOODTHINKFUL sería la expresión de Newspeak) en tendencia. En la práctica esto significaba
que ningún libro escrito antes de aproximadamente 1960 podría traducirse como un todo. Prerrevolucionario

George Orwell

19 8 4

343

la literatura solo puede ser sometida a traducción ideológica, es decir, alteración tanto en el sentido como en el
lenguaje. Tomemos, por ejemplo, el conocido pasaje de la Declaración de Independencia:

SOSTENIMOS ESTAS VERDADES PARA SER AUTO EVIDENTES, QUE TODOS LOS HOMBRES SON CREADOS IGUALES,
QUE ESTÁN DOTADOS POR SU CREADOR CON CIERTOS DERECHOS INALIENABLES,
QUE ENTRE ESTOS SON LA VIDA, LA LIBERTAD Y LA BÚSQUEDA DE LA FELICIDAD. QUE PARA
ASEGURAR ESTOS DERECHOS, LOS GOBIERNOS SE INSTITUYEN ENTRE HOMBRES, DERIVANDO
SUS PODERES DEL CONSENTIMIENTO DE LOS GOBERNADOS. QUE CUANDO CUALQUIER FORMA
DE GOBIERNO SE DESTRUCTIVA DE ESOS FINALES, ES EL DERECHO DE LAS
PERSONAS ALTERARLA O ABOLIRLA, E INSTITUIR AL NUEVO GOBIERNO …

Hubiera sido bastante imposible convertir esto en Newspeak manteniendo el sentido del
original. Lo más cercano a hacerlo sería tragarse todo el pasaje en la
sola palabra CRIMETHINK. Una traducción completa solo podría ser una traducción ideológica, mediante
la cual las palabras de Jefferson se cambiarían a un panegírico sobre el gobierno absoluto.

De hecho, buena parte de la literatura del pasado ya se estaba transformando de esta manera.
Consideraciones de prestigio hicieron que fuera deseable preservar la memoria de ciertas figuras históricas,
al tiempo que alineaba sus logros con la filosofía de Ingsoc. Varios escritores,
como Shakespeare, Milton, Swift, Byron, Dickens y algunos otros, estaban en proceso de
traducción: cuando la tarea se hubiera completado, sus escritos originales, con todo lo que sobrevivió de la
literatura del pasado, serían destruido. Estas traducciones fueron un negocio lento y difícil, y no
se esperaba que se terminaran antes de la primera o segunda década de la vigésima primera.
siglo. También había grandes cantidades de literatura meramente utilitaria (
manuales técnicos indispensables y similares) que debían tratarse de la misma manera. Fue principalmente para dar tiempo
al trabajo preliminar de traducción que la adopción final de Newspeak se había fijado para una
fecha tan tardía como 2050.

This entry was posted in .. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>